TV Diary

Getting in one final TV Diary post before the end of the year, so that I’ve written about everything I’ve watched or started watching this year before I write my most memorable pop-culture post next week, not that (spoiler alert) any of these shows are showing up on it.

The Recruit

The Recruit is a new show on Netflix. We’re only a few episodes into it so far, but I’m very much enjoying it. I saw a lot of tv critics comparing it to the show USA used to produce like White Collar, Covert Affairs, and Burn Notice. I loved those shows and miss that sort of episodic tv that also had a good season long story arc you were following as well. I get the comparison, though this show is less episodic than those were. From what I’ve seen so far it’s got good action and some decent humor. I do find it a little ridiculous how his co-workers are out to get him from the second he starts the job, but overall it’s a light, fun show.

I Hate Christmas

I am also only halfway through the Netflix show I Hate Christmas, but I already know exactly what is going to happen because this Italian show is a remake of the Norwegian show Home For Christmas, which we watched the previous two Christmas seasons. I think this is the first time I have ever watched a foreign show that is a remake of another foreign show that I’ve previously watched. This version is set in Venice and pretty much has the same plot lines of a woman who makes up a boyfriend because she is tired of her family giving her a hard time about being single and now she has 25 days to find someone to bring home to Christmas. I really liked the original series, and I’m enjoying this one as well. The Norwegian show had two seasons, so I’ll be curious to see if this has another season next year.

So Help Me Todd

Skylar Astin plays a sort of screw-up who lost his PI license and now is trying to get it back while working for his mother played by Marcia Gay Harden at her law firm. He’s always trying to push the boundaries. It’s mostly a procedural. There’s a case of the week and not really any overarching plot aside from his relationship with his family and his ex who also works at the law firm. It’s unfortunate that he has better chemistry with the actress playing his sister than he does with the actress playing his ex who we are obviously supposed to be rooting to get back together. I have literally fallen asleep watching every single episode until the last one of 2022. I have enjoyed it well enough to go back and rewatch it the next day, but it’s also not something I’m going to be crying in cereal about if it doesn’t get another season.

Bluey

It’s me. Hi. I’m the middle aged woman with no children watching a TV show designed for pre-schoolers. I have heard any number of adults talk about how good this show is. Most of them had kids. Some tv critics who have extolled it have kids but none of the age who would have ever watched this show, so it obviously does appeal to adults. I can’t even exactly put my finger on why. It’s very simple animation. It does have heart to it. I think if I did actually have kids I would want to ban them from watching it for the simple fact that it has to create unrealistic expectations for kids about how their parents should just drop whatever they are doing to play with them at all times. The episodes are only 7 minutes long, so it’s a nice quick hit of sweetness.

Fresh Off the Boat

I’ve been watching Fresh Off the Boat on and off for much of this year. I’m just starting the final season. I’ve definitely slowed down in my watching the last couple of seasons. It’s not that it’s gotten bad as much as it’s just gotten rote. It feels like all the jokes and stories are just super repetitive at this point. I’ll finish it, but the early seasons are much better. I also liked the kids better when they were younger. It’s a pretty decent sit-com though.

Wednesday

I gather that Wednesday was a gigantic hit for Netflix and that lots of people really love it. I thought it was fine. I think Julia Ortega is very good in the role. I just didn’t get super into the show overall. I’m sure there will be additional seasons because it was so popular. I’ll probably keep watching it if there are.

Gadget Man

We previously watched and really liked the show Travel Man in which Richard Ayoade traveled to various countries accompanied by another comedian. I don’t think that show is available streaming in the United States anymore, and I’m not sure that we were even able to watch all of Richard Ayoade’s seasons of it. I gather it’s still being filmed with a new host, but again not available here so I don’t know how it is with the new host. Anyway, we recently discovered that some, but not all (and not even consecutively numbered seasons) of Ayoade’s show previous to Travel Man called Gadget Man are available on Amazon Prime. So we’ve been watching them. It’s definitely not as good as Travel Man, but it has some of the same-ish structure and sense of humor so it’s a quick sort of trifle of a show to watch when we want something less than a half hour.

Fleishman is in Trouble

I should probably wait to write about this show until I’ve seen the rest of the season or I guess even the episode that dropped today given how many critics put in on their favorite episode list before it even aired. Maybe it will completely the turn the show around for me to, and I’ll understand why everyone seems to be in love with it. That is except for the one critic who called it boring. That’s pretty much my assessment of it. I’m bored. I read the book. I really liked the book. I am completely and utterly bored with this adaptation of it. Even my annoyance at the characters doesn’t rise to enough of a level to overcome the boredom.

Quantum Leap

I never watched the original Quantum Leap. I was at the completely wrong age for it when it aired. We have been watching the reboot, but I’m mostly just sitting in the room while my husband watches it. I don’t really care about it at all as evidenced by the fact that I have never gone back and rewatched any of the episodes that I’ve fallen asleep during. I’ve never been super into procedurals. This does have some sort of overarching plotline, but it feels completely inconsequential because the show is over if Sam dies or they figure out how to make him quit leaping, so it has no stakes and I don’t care about it. I will probably eventually quit even bothering to be in the room if my husband wants to keep watching it.

TV Diary

It’s been way too long since I’ve written one of these posts as evidenced by some of the shows I’m going to be writing about. It feels like I watched She-Hulk ages ago. Better late than never I guess.

The Big Brunch

For some reason I wasn’t sold on this show after the first episode, but luckily I kept watching because after that I fell in love with it. It’s a delightful baking show with Dan Levy hosting and judging along with two other people. All the challenges surround having something to do with brunch in some themed way. The contestants are all competing to win $300,000 to further their business plans related to cooking, which are vastly different. You want them all to get the money, but it was especially hard to see the people who had visions for things that are really helping their communities lose. It has such good vibes all the way around.

Welcome to Wrexham

I feel like this documentary about Rob Mcelhenney and Ryan Reynolds buying the Wrexham football club is riding the coattails of people’s love for Ted Lasso, but I still found it enjoyable. I am not a sportsy person. I pretty much never watch actual sports, but I am a huge sucker for sports documentaries or scripted shows where I get to know a lot about the people and all that story is only briefly interrupted by only the most exciting or relevant parts of the actual sporsting matches. This show is perfect for that. Rob and Ryan are fun together and you’ll be cheering for the team and the people of Wrexham.

Mo

Mo is a Netflix show about a Palestinian refugee who has been living in Houston with his family as an undocumented immigrant for most of his life. His father died years ago, his adult brother is on the autism spectrum, his mother is still very religious and trying to keep Mo connected to his Muslim heritage, and he’s dating a Mexican Catholic woman against his mother’s wishes. It’s both a funny and heartbreaking show. It’s probably something that has flown under your radar, but I highly recommend watching it.

The Patient

I can’t really say that The Patient was an enjoyable watch because the subject matter is pretty bleak. It’s a well made show starring Steve Carell as a psychiatrist who is kidnapped by one of his patients who it turns out is a serial killer trying to cure himself. There are some interesting twists and turns, and I think it ended the only way it really could. So really good prestige television, yes. A delightful romp, no.

She-Hulk

For the most part I have been uninterested in the Marvel TV shows on Disney+ and have watched very few of them. My husband insisted that I at least try this one out. I found it to be a pretty fun show. It’s more sit-com than the other Marvel shows. I enjoy when Marvel stuff is more humorous than serious hence why the Thor movies are my favorite. I’m not mad I watched it, but overall it felt like a trifle, and I didn’t understand their use of Jameela Jamil’s character, who seemed set up to be a sort of big bad nemesis but then wasn’t really. Also, I had a very hard time with the CGI. The She-Hulk version of Jen was atrocious and it bugged me every time she was hulked out.

Reboot

Reboot is about the cast and writers of a popular 90s sitcom (think ABC TGIF type sitcoms) that is being rebooted. The original writer who is returning, but his daughter who has pitched the reboot as an edgier show is also there and they butt heads over the direction of the show and what’s funny. The original cast is back bringing their own baggage and past relationships with them. It was a pretty good show with an excellent cast. It wasn’t perfect, but I would definitely be happy to see another season.

Partner Track

This was a pretty terrible rom-com type show on Netflix about twentysomething lawyers who are trying to make partner at their terrible law firm while also getting involved romantically with one another. I could not tell any of the white bro male characters apart. I kind of hated all the characters and found it really dumb that the female lead was obsessed with the guy who she slept with once ages ago drunkenly at a wedding while the amazingly awesome boyfriend she has is supposed to be somehow the worst because he’s moving a little fast in their relationship when the other guy is the actual worst. I also did not care about nor could I really follow what was happening with all the law cases that were supposed to be part of the plot. There was a big bombshell at the end of the final episode, but Netflix has saved me from myself in wanting to see what happens next by canceling this show after one season.

Blockbuster

I was excited when they announced this sitcom about people working in the last Blockbuster. It’s unfortunate that it is 100% terrible, and I cannot recommend that you watch a single second of it. I cannot in any way defend the fact that we watched all 10 episodes. It is not funny in any way. The characters are all ridiculous caricatures of people, but not in any way that is good. I’m somehow supposed to believe that Melissa Fumero, Randall Park, and J.B. Smoove all went to high school together despite the fact that none of them are remotely close in age to each other and it clearly shows. There’s no chemistry between Randall Park and Melissa Fumero, so I did not care a whit about their forced will they or won’t they relationship. Don’t be dumb like me. Don’t watch this show.

TV Diary

I’m back with another roundup of what I’ve been watching since the last time I wrote one of these posts.

The Summer I Turned Pretty

The Summer I Turned Pretty is an Amazon show based on a YA book by Jenny Han, who also wrote To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, which was a smash Netflix movie. I have never read any of the books, but I preferred this over To All the Boys. Probably partly because it was a series instead of a movie which gave more time for the story to breathe. The things that annoyed me the most all had to do with the debutante ball, but I’m sure all that stuff is straight from the book and not some plot pulled out of thin air. So I don’t hold it against the show itself. I too would like to live a life where my rich friends invite me to live at their beach house with them all summer, but alas I think this is only something that happens in book, tv, and movies. This show has excellent YA romance love triangles/squares plus rich people beach house porn. What’s not to love?

Our Flag Means Death

Our Flag Means Death is definitely for a particular taste and sense of humor, but luckily it was to my taste. It’s a Taika Waititi show, which should give you some general idea if it’s for you or not. Stede Bonnet is a rich, married man who abandons his wife and children to become a pirate despite not actually liking anything that pirates have to do. He pulls together a rag tag bunch of sailors for his crew and they set out to prove themselves as pirates despite Stede’s aversion to actually torturing or murdering anyone. They get into battle and then join forces with Captain Blackbeard (played by Waititi) and his crew. It’s got a dry, sort of twisted sense of humor and some nice slow burning love stories.

Ms. Marvel

Ms. Marvel is the only one of the Disney Marvel tv shows I have watched (though my husband is making me watch She-Hulk now). Overall I enjoyed it though sometimes found it to be a clunky mix between a coming of age story and a superhero show. I vastly preferred the coming of age parts of the story and really wish that it had been about a Kamala’s life as a teenage girl trying to figure out her life without all the superhero stuff tacked on.

Uncoupled

I’ve seen a lot of shade thrown at this show, but all the things that seemed to bother a lot of other people didn’t bother me as such. I don’t care that I’m watching a show about rich people problems with a bunch of unrealistic characters. I also love/hate Emily in Paris by the same creator, though he also created Sex in the City, which I did eventually watch all of but never liked. This I more straight up like, but I also don’t think it’s the best show in the world. It’s for sure living in a different reality than most people. Neil Patrick Harris’s character is for sure annoying and self-centered, but the reason that it works is because his friends call him on it. He doesn’t get to just wander around being self-absorbed without anyone pointing out what an ass he’s being. I found it an enjoyable way to escape from regular life for 5 hours.

Yellowjackets

Thanks to an Amazon Prime Day deal we subscribed to Showtime for a month for 99 cents to finally watch Yellowjackets, which everyone else had been going on about months and months ago. They did a phenomenal job casting the adult and teenage versions of the characters. I’m interested in it enough to watch another season, but I’m not in love with it as much as everyone else seems to be. I just don’t care enough about whatever evil mysterious thing is wherever the plane crash landed that’s leading the girls to do whatever it is that they did. I know they’re adding adult versions of some of the other girls, so I guess it will be interesting to see how they expand out the present day world as I did sort of wonder what happened to everyone else and why we were only focused on these four women.

God’s Favorite Idiot

God’s Favorite Idiot is a Netflix show starring Melissa McCarthy and her husband Ben Falcone. He is apparently chosen by God for something that is unclear to him. While he’s trying to figure that out Lucifer comes after him. It’s a comedy and all a little bit non-sensical, but I enjoyed it well enough.

Severence

Based on everything I heard about Severence on AppleTV+ before I started watching it, I had kind of assumed it was a comedy. It’s not really. It’s more of a drama, though I guess it has some twisted comedic undertones. It’s certainly not a straightforward, laugh out loud comedy. That’s for sure. People seemed to love this show, but I did not. I mostly found it boring. It definitely lost my attention and I either slept through parts of it or was playing on my phone enough to not really know what exactly happened. I for sure could not tell you what happened at the end of the season. If there is another season of this show, I shan’t be watching it.

The Bear

In keeping with the trend of shows that everyone seemed to love that didn’t do much for me, we have The Bear. I centers on a renowned high end chef who moves back to Chicago to take over his brother’s sandwich shop after his brother commits suicide. He tries to make lots of changes to how the business is run and everything sort of falls apart. People talked a lot about how stressful the show was to watch. I can see that. Literally every episode I don’t know how these people managed to serve food to anyone. However, I personally didn’t feel stressed watching it. Perhaps because I never worked in the food industry so it didn’t bring up any personal experiences for me. I thought the show was okay, but not the masterpiece other people seem to think it is.

TV Diary

Still catching up on some TV shows I watched awhile ago.

With Love

With Love is a show on Amazon Prime that revolves around an extended Latinx family and various love stories within it. Each episode takes place on a different holiday so you’re moving quite a bit through time from episode to episode. It made it a little hard to invest in some the characters and relationships, but I thought it was cute. It’s apparently been renewed for a second season. I’m not sure where they will take it from here as it felt pretty self contained, but I guess I’ll find out eventually.

Julia

For the most part I enjoyed Julia on HBOMax. Sarah Lancaster did a great job of playing Julia. I also really enjoyed BeBe Neuwirth as her best friend. It was interesting to see how the show was created, though I have no idea how much of this is fact versus fiction. I did feel at times like Julia was too whiny, and I really could not with her husband. I feel like I always heard that they had this great relationship and that he was so supportive of her. And eventually by the end of this season he had come around and seemed to be more on her side, but good lord what a man baby whose little feelings are hurt because he got forced into retirement and now his wife is having success. Hopefully there will be less of that in the next season.

Heartstoppers

This was a cute adaptation of a series of graphic novels about two teenage boys exploring their sexuality and falling in love. I never read the books, but from what I gather from people online it was an extremely faithful adaptation with literal shot for shot recreations of some of the illustrations. I gather people were really happy with it, which as you know when people have strong feelings about a book is really hard to do. I also heard a lot of queer adults saying that they wish that they had had something like this when they were growing up, so it’s good that kids these days do especially given all the efforts to legally and otherwise try and stuff LGBTQ+ people back in the closet. I don’t think I connected with it as strongly as other people, which is fine. It was not made for me, but I’m really happy that it seems to mean a lot to the people it was meant for.

Ghosts (British Version)

The hit CBS sitcom Ghosts was actually adapted from a British sitcom that is available on HBOMax. They’re pretty fairly equivalent. I think I like the lead actress in this version better than the CBS one, but I also like the actor who plays the husband better in the British version so I guess it balances out. Same with some of the ghosts. There was a joke about not eating rice krispies until they’re dead (i.e. no longer making noise) that I still cannot stop laughing at, and that I mention every time my husband eats rice krispies. Solid bit that.

We Own This City

We Own This City is a show created by David Simon based on a true story and book written by former Baltimore Sun and now Baltimore Banner reporter, Justin Fenton. A lot of critics and people of course compared this to The Wire, which it’s not and isn’t meant to be because it’s not The Wire. They seemed to be mad about that. I thought the show was fine, but I wasn’t upset that it wasn’t The Wire. As someone who read the book and lived through all the news coverage while it was happening the show didn’t have much to offer me other than the way it portrayed the story that I already knew really well. The show was way too convoluted presenting the story jumping around in time with sometimes only very subtle clues as to what year you were in. I could sometimes barely figure it out and I have to think that anyone coming to this story cold would have to be confused a lot.

Under the Banner of Heaven

Speaking of shows based on books, Under the Banner of Heaven is an adaptation of the book by John Krakauer about a murder and a crazy Mormon sect. Again the show was fine, but it in no way did the book justice. I remember loving this book when I read it and finding it super compelling. I didn’t want to put it down. I did not feel anything like that for this show. I could very easily have stopped watching it at any time and not felt like I was missing anything.

First Kill

First Kill is a new teen vampire show where the vampire and vampire hunter fall in love. It’s of course reminiscent of things like Buffy and Vampire Diaries, but it’s also very heavily based on Romeo and Juliet with the families of the two girls warring and telling them they need to stay away from each other. It was in no way actually good. It does have Elizabeth Mitchell in it though, so that’s a bonus. However most of the acting is pretty terrible or the writing is or maybe both.I still binge watche the stupid thing in two days.

TV Diary

I am way behind on posting about the tv I’ve been watching. Looking at the list of new shows I keep for these posts I’m realizing I finished some of them months ago.

From Cradle to Stage

This show is 100% made for me. It’s based on a book by Dave Grohl’s mom, Virginia, in which she interviewed the moms of musical artists about their childhoods and how they got into music. In the show Dave Grohl and his mom go around and make these conversations into little documentary episodes. Each episode is interspersed with Dave and his mom talking about his own experiences with music growing up and his career. I love it so much. It’s literally the only thing worth watching on Paramount+, which I only have because we got a free subscription. This was pretty much the only thing I found to watch. I don’t care that much for the Foo Fighters, but from everything I can tell Dave Grohl is the biggest mensch. If that ever changes literally no one tell me because I don’t want to know. He also has made several music documentary films and tv shows that I love so much. The final episode showed Virginia Grohl having a lunch with all the moms featured in her book and there were more people there than were featured in the show, so I really hope that they make another season featuring some of these other moms. I will pay for Paramount+ just to watch it.

The Guilded Age

This show is barely about anything other than looking at people in pretty dresses living in pretty houses and being scandalized by anyone who dares not have been born into their money trying to get into their circles. It’s utterly ridiculous, but yet I enjoyed it. I could use less of the downstairs people in this show. I know they were a big part of Julian Fellows previous show, Downton Abbey, but here they’re not as well integrated into a show so much so that I don’t even know which of them work in which house. This show doesn’t need to be about them. Also, I have to hand it to this show for having a season finale in which literally nothing happened despite the fact that it was an hour long. It really is an impressive feat.

You’re the Worst

I avoided watching You’re the Worst for a long time because I don’t like shows where everyone is terrible and that was my impression of what this show was. I wasn’t really wrong about that, but I also really wound up like this show. It’s the first show I’ve truly binge watched in quite awhile. In a lot of ways it’s over the top ridiculous, but there are also some really real moments about living with mental illness and being in a relationship with someone with mental illness that make it really lovely. Even though the characters were awful I liked them. The only thing I will say is that it worked better for me when they only interacted with each other because then it was a whole circle of awfulness that really only affected them. I didn’t care for the episodes where there were outside people who were affected by it. Luckily those didn’t happen very often.

Single Drunk Female

Single Drunk Female is about a twenty-something alcoholic woman trying to get her life together after she hits rock bottom and gets sober. Her mom, who she is living with but who has had enough of her drama is played by Ally Sheedy. It’s an enjoyable little half hour show that airs on Freeform and is available on Hulu, which is where I watched it. I’m happy that it got renewed for another season.

The Newsreader

The Newsreader is an Australian show that is available to watch on the Roku Channel. It takes place in the 80s and stars Anna Torv, who should really have more roles on tv, as a news anchor with a mental illness, who has a nervous breakdown and who is helped out by a coworker who she decides to help work his way into being a news anchor as well. They start dating, but he is also secretly gay and lying to both her and himself about it. Each episode surrounds a big news story. Most of them were things that were also big enough stories that they were things I knew about. There was one episode featuring a bombing in Melbourne that I know nothing about, but which I assume was also real since the other stories were. It was a good show, and I recommend watching it. I have no idea if you have to have a Roku to watch the Roku Channel, but if you do have one watch it and see if you can anyway if you don’t have one.

The Dropout

I waited to long to review this show because I know I had some very specific thoughts about it, but now I can’t really remember what they were. I know there were various uses of music that felt way too on the nose to me and several pop cultural references that felt very heavy handed in trying to let you know what year you were in at a particular time. I think Amanda Seyfriend did a good job in the role. It was maddening that her house of cards was able to go on for so long.

TV Diary: Sit-Com Edition

There are a number of new sit-coms that debuted midseason that I’m really enjoying. Some of these shows stretch the definition of sit-com, but they’re all 30 minute comedy-ish shows so that’s how I’m classifying them for the purposes of writing about these shows.

Grand Crew

Grand Crew is my favorite of the new sit-coms. It’s a great hang out comedy about a group of friends. It reminds me of some of the things I loved about Friends. Instead of hanging out a coffee shop they hang out at a wine bar called Grand Cru. Nicole Byer is probably the biggest name in the cast along with Echo Kellum who plays her brother in the show, but it’s a real ensemble comedy. It’s funny. I like the characters, and I just really enjoy hanging out with them every week.

Abbott Elementary

Abbott Elementary is the show that has gotten the most press out of all the new sit-coms. It’s about an underfunded school in Philadelphia. It’s a workplace ensemble comedy. Janine is sort of the main focus of the show, played by Quinta Brunson, who created it. She’s a new teacher who is still full of energy and wanting to do the best for her students despite a system designed to beat you down. There are also another new teacher, a long-term sub, and the older teachers who are still trying to get things done but are also more resigned to the system they’re stuck in plus the laughably ineffective principal. It’s both funny but all too real. It’s in a mockumentary format, which is not my favorite, but there have been some really hilarious looks towards the supposed cameraman that have almost made it worth it.

Pivoting

I would have said Pivoting was my least favorite of the new network sitcoms, but I feel like a handful of episodes in it’s starting to find its footing a little bit more. The last couple of episodes have had at least one thing that made me really laugh out loud. The premise is a group of three friends who are reevaluating their own lives after the death of the other woman who was a close part of their friend group. Eliza Coupe is a reluctant mother who loves her kids but doesn’t know what to do with them and decides to scale back on work to spend half days with them. Maggie Q plays a successful doctor who decides to quit her job to work in a grocery store. Jennifer Goodwin plays a dissatisfied wife and mother who decides to try and have an affair with her personal trainer. There’s some good comedy here and think once the show gets to develop the characters a little more beyond the summary note they used to sell the show it will get even better.

American Auto

American Auto is another workplace comedy. It stars Ana Gasteyer as the new CEO of a car company who has no experience with cars and came from work at a pharmaceutical company. It’s created by the same people who did Superstore and is sort of the opposite of that show in that instead of focusing on the people out on floor it’s focused on the people in executive suite. It has its moments, but at this point it’s probably my least favorite of the shows. It’s still a solid comedy though and I think again it has the potential to get even better as the writers figure out what makes each of the characters really tick, which an take a little bit for sit-coms.

Sort-Of

I’m really happy that the Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast alerted to me this as they were correct that I never would have found it otherwise. It’s a Canadian show available on HBOMax. It’s not something HBOMax is ever going to recommend to you. It’s my least favorite thing about every streaming service is that they basically only allow you to see like whatever 10 shows they are promoting and their algorithm decides you would like. There is really no way to easily browse their full library of content and find the more obscure stuff unless you already know about it and do a search for the title. Sort-Of is centered around trans woman, Sabi, who is a Pakistani-Canadian trying to come out to her mother. She is also the nanny to two kids. She makes the decision to move to Berlin with her best friend, but stays back to help out after the mother of the kids she nannies for gets in an accident and winds up in a coma. It’s a really great show with lots of interesting relationships. I’m not sure if it will get more than these short 8 episodes, but I do hope so.

Somebody Somewhere

Somebody Somewhere is an actual HBO show that is currently airing is about halfway through its first season. It’s about a woman who has returned home to her small town in Kansas to help take care of her dying sister, and who is now staying there after her sister’s death dealing with the rest of her family and figuring out her life there. She reconnects with an old friend from high school who runs sort of an underground gay choir in his church and he convinces her to join. It too has some really good characters and relationships, and I’m happy HBO has already announced there will be another season.

The Woman in the House Across the Street from the Girl in the Window

This Netflix show is a sort of parody of the movies like Gone Girl and the Woman in the Window starring Kristen Bell. I gather from some friends that perhaps it gets better or at least people were happy enough with where it went by the end, but I really just did not like the first episode at all. I saw some headline to the effect of that it’s a mysterious comedy that is neither mysterious nor comedic and that felt true to what I saw. I don’t think I am going to spend my time watching any more of it, but you can at least know that some people I know liked it better than I did.

TV Diary

I have a lot of new tv I’ve been watching to talk about. This is what happens when you’re one of the last people living still mostly locked down during the pandemic and it’s cold outside so you can’t even have an outdoor social life. You watch lots and lots of tv. This is just part of it. I’ll back later this week with a post specifically about sit-coms.

The Sex Lives of College Girls

Mindy Kaling has found her real sweet spot in creating teenage rom-com tv shows first with Never Have I Ever and now Sex Lives of College Girls on HBOMax. The Mindy Project had its moments, but I quit watching it even before NBC canceled it and then it moved to Hulu. I never even bothered watching her series version of Four Weddings and a Funeral because the reviews were so bad. Now though she is creating some of my favorite tv shows. I loved The Sex Lives of College Girls so much. I’m so sad that I’m out of episodes to watch. It centers around four freshman roommates at the fictional Essex College in Vermont. Leighton is a legacy whose parents went to Essex and her older brother already attends. She is also a closeted lesbian. Bela is an Indian girl whose parents want her to become a doctor while she wants to pursue comedy and is determined to make it as a writer for the school’s renowned comedy magazine while also making up for what she feels is lost time in her lack of a social and sex life in high school. Whitney is on the soccer team and her mother is a Senator. She is also having an affair with the team’s assistant coach. Kimberly is a somewhat naive girl from the mid-West who doesn’t have much money unlike most of the people at Essex who is trying to navigate her way in this new world. She is the character who is the most cartoonish. Either I got used to it or they dialed it back some over the course of the show. I loved this show. I loved the characters. I loved the friendships and the relationships. It’s a perfect teen dramedy, and I cannot wait until there are more episodes.

Elite

The Netflix algorithm knows I love a good teen drama so at some point it recommended this Spanish show to me. I added it to my queue and after it sitting there for years I finally decided to watch it. I’m really glad I did because Netflix was right and I did love it. There are four seasons so far and Netflix assures me a fifth season is coming. It centers on an elite private school in Madrid where lots of rich and important people send their kids to school. No one should ever send their kids there though because every season is framed with some sort of murder or attempted murder. Basically if your kid goes there they’re either going to be murdered or become a murderer. I thought maybe after the sort of throughline of the first three seasons was done that in season four they would drop the framing where you start with whatever that season’s crime was with everyone being interviewed by the cops and the show filling in what happened up to that point over the season, but they did not. I wish they had because they never really needed it. I’m much more interested in the relationships between the characters than I ever was about who committed whatever crime we were focused on that season. The first three seasons are great. The fourth season I don’t think was as good. Half of the original characters left after season three including most of my favorites. I did not like any of the new characters they brought into replace them, the stories seemed even more ridiculous than normal, and the personalities of the characters that came back did not seem consistent with previous season. Made me feel like they got a bunch of new writers in season four. Don’t get me wrong, I still enjoyed watching it and will definitely be watching season five whenever it comes out. If you like a good teen drama and aren’t opposed to subtitles I recommend it.

Maid

Maid is a Netflix show loosely based on Stephanie Land’s memoir of the same name. It stars Margaret Qualley as Alex a young mother who flees her abusive husband and winds up working as a maid to support herself and her pre-school age daughter. She is equally caught in trying to get help from her mother who has undiagnosed bipolar disorder and having to take care of her. Her mother is played by Andie McDowell, Qualley’s real life mother. This show is excellent, but it is also one of the hardest shows I think I have ever watched. I definitely could not watch more than one episode of this in a sitting. I felt the stress that this character was going through. It made me really sad because I know there are so many people who are actually living this life where they are just caught in impossible situation after impossible situation and all the systems that are supposedly there to help them are built such that it’s actually impossible to get help from them and even make things worse. It really highlights how broken the systems in the country are because we’re so worried about someone who we don’t think deserves something getting it. Because the show does not want to be complete misery porn it winds up ending on a positive note for the character, but there are far too many people who will never manage to navigate their way out of lives that are stacked against them at every turn.

As We See It

As We See It is the new Jason Katims show on Amazon Prime. You may know Katims from his previous shows Friday Night Lights and Parenthood. He featured some of his experiences as a parent of an autistic son in the character of Max Braverman on Parenthood. Now he extends that into his experiences parenting a child with autism who is now an adult themselves. It centers around three autistic adults in their 20s sharing an apartment and being cared for by an aide named Mandy. Jack is really smart but struggling to keep a job because of his lack of social skills and inflexibility. He is also faced with finding out that his father has what will probably be terminal cancer. This story also focuses on his father worrying about how to make sure Jack is going to be all right after he’s gone. Violet is a sex obsessed woman who just wants people to perceive her as normal and doesn’t realize that her overattachment to people even strangers is inappropriate and potentially dangerous. She is being cared for by her older brother Van since their parents died. Harrison is the least functioning of the three. He is practically agoraphobic and Mandy is working with him to get him to leave the apartment and gain skills so that he too might be able to support himself in some fashion one day. In true Jason Katims fashion it mixes complete heartbreak with small triumphs that warm the heart. It does not however gloss over the difficulties of all of the characters with the autistic characters just wanting to be understood for who they are and not always understanding why people view them as they do and their families struggling with the weight of helping their loved ones navigate an unforgiving world and the stresses that they themselves have to deal with.

Station Eleven

I read the book Station Eleven back in 2015 and did not re-read it prior to watching the series on HBO, so I didn’t remember enough about it to know how faithful it was or not to the source material. I gather from the things I’ve heard about it that there was quite a bit changed, but that everyone seemed to agree that the changes worked. So let’s go with that. I do know that I felt differently about the book than I did the tv show. I remember feeling like there was a lot of hope in the book that I did not necessarily feel in the tv show. Perhaps some of that is that I read the book prior to having ever lived through a pandemic myself, so I’m pretty sure my feelings about the tv show were colored by my own experiences. The pandemic in this show is way worse than COVID, killing something like 99% of the population. It was sort of interesting watching the end of this as the supply chain shortages caused by so many people getting sick from Omicron were starting to ramp up given this series shows how much worse it could have been with these characters living in a post-apocalyptic world in which pretty much all of the things we have come to rely on as a modern society like all kinds of technology cease to function because there aren’t enough people to keep them running. Weirdly my favorite parts of the series were the parts with Jeevan and young Kiersten struggling to survive right after the pandemic happened, which is something I usually hate and why I don’t tend to care for post-apocalyptic shows or books, and which I said in my review of the book that I was happy it didn’t spend a lot of time on. Ultimately I really did like this show, but based on how i remember feeling after reading the book I liked it better which is generally the case when it comes to book adaptations.

Good Sam

Good Sam stars Sophia Bush and Jason Isaacs. He’s a world renowned cardiologist who is very difficult to work with. Sam is his daughter who has been working under him but is planning on leaving the hospital for another job until he is shot and they ask her to fill in as the Chief of Cardiology. Now he’s back at his job and having to be supervised by her until the medical board signs off on his recovery and is very unhappy about being subordinate to anyone, especially his daughter. It’s sort of a mix between House and Grey’s Anatomy with a curmudgeonly but brilliant doctor at the center, a case of the week, and some soapy elements mixed together. It’s a decent network drama that’s more than just a straight procedural if you enjoy these kinds of shows.

Around the World in 80 Days

Masterpiece on PBS is currently airing this new adaptation of the Around the World in 80 Days starring David Tennant. It’s fine. I don’t love it. I’m usually doing something else like reading or messing around on the internet when my husband puts it on.

TV Diary

I have a lot of new tv I’ve been watching to talk about. This is what happens when you’re one of the last people living still mostly locked down during the pandemic and it’s cold outside so you can’t even have an outdoor social life. You watch lots and lots of tv. This is just part of it. I’ll back later this week with a post specifically about sit-coms.

The Sex Lives of College Girls

Mindy Kaling has found her real sweet spot in creating teenage rom-com tv shows first with Never Have I Ever and now Sex Lives of College Girls on HBOMax. The Mindy Project had its moments, but I quit watching it even before NBC canceled it and then it moved to Hulu. I never even bothered watching her series version of Four Weddings and a Funeral because the reviews were so bad. Now though she is creating some of my favorite tv shows. I loved The Sex Lives of College Girls so much. I’m so sad that I’m out of episodes to watch. It centers around four freshman roommates at the fictional Essex College in Vermont. Leighton is a legacy whose parents went to Essex and her older brother already attends. She is also a closeted lesbian. Bela is an Indian girl whose parents want her to become a doctor while she wants to pursue comedy and is determined to make it as a writer for the school’s renowned comedy magazine while also making up for what she feels is lost time in her lack of a social and sex life in high school. Whitney is on the soccer team and her mother is a Senator. She is also having an affair with the team’s assistant coach. Kimberly is a somewhat naive girl from the mid-West who doesn’t have much money unlike most of the people at Essex who is trying to navigate her way in this new world. She is the character who is the most cartoonish. Either I got used to it or they dialed it back some over the course of the show. I loved this show. I loved the characters. I loved the friendships and the relationships. It’s a perfect teen dramedy, and I cannot wait until there are more episodes.

Elite

The Netflix algorithm knows I love a good teen drama so at some point it recommended this Spanish show to me. I added it to my queue and after it sitting there for years I finally decided to watch it. I’m really glad I did because Netflix was right and I did love it. There are four seasons so far and Netflix assures me a fifth season is coming. It centers on an elite private school in Madrid where lots of rich and important people send their kids to school. No one should ever send their kids there though because every season is framed with some sort of murder or attempted murder. Basically if your kid goes there they’re either going to be murdered or become a murderer. I thought maybe after the sort of throughline of the first three seasons was done that in season four they would drop the framing where you start with whatever that season’s crime was with everyone being interviewed by the cops and the show filling in what happened up to that point over the season, but they did not. I wish they had because they never really needed it. I’m much more interested in the relationships between the characters than I ever was about who committed whatever crime we were focused on that season. The first three seasons are great. The fourth season I don’t think was as good. Half of the original characters left after season three including most of my favorites. I did not like any of the new characters they brought into replace them, the stories seemed even more ridiculous than normal, and the personalities of the characters that came back did not seem consistent with previous season. Made me feel like they got a bunch of new writers in season four. Don’t get me wrong, I still enjoyed watching it and will definitely be watching season five whenever it comes out. If you like a good teen drama and aren’t opposed to subtitles I recommend it.

Maid

Maid is a Netflix show loosely based on Stephanie Land’s memoir of the same name. It stars Margaret Qualley as Alex a young mother who flees her abusive husband and winds up working as a maid to support herself and her pre-school age daughter. She is equally caught in trying to get help from her mother who has undiagnosed bipolar disorder and having to take care of her. Her mother is played by Andie McDowell, Qualley’s real life mother. This show is excellent, but it is also one of the hardest shows I think I have ever watched. I definitely could not watch more than one episode of this in a sitting. I felt the stress that this character was going through. It made me really sad because I know there are so many people who are actually living this life where they are just caught in impossible situation after impossible situation and all the systems that are supposedly there to help them are built such that it’s actually impossible to get help from them and even make things worse. It really highlights how broken the systems in the country are because we’re so worried about someone who we don’t think deserves something getting it. Because the show does not want to be complete misery porn it winds up ending on a positive note for the character, but there are far too many people who will never manage to navigate their way out of lives that are stacked against them at every turn.

As We See It

As We See It is the new Jason Katims show on Amazon Prime. You may know Katims from his previous shows Friday Night Lights and Parenthood. He featured some of his experiences as a parent of an autistic son in the character of Max Braverman on Parenthood. Now he extends that into his experiences parenting a child with autism who is now an adult themselves. It centers around three autistic adults in their 20s sharing an apartment and being cared for by an aide named Mandy. Jack is really smart but struggling to keep a job because of his lack of social skills and inflexibility. He is also faced with finding out that his father has what will probably be terminal cancer. This story also focuses on his father worrying about how to make sure Jack is going to be all right after he’s gone. Violet is a sex obsessed woman who just wants people to perceive her as normal and doesn’t realize that her overattachment to people even strangers is inappropriate and potentially dangerous. She is being cared for by her older brother Van since their parents died. Harrison is the least functioning of the three. He is practically agoraphobic and Mandy is working with him to get him to leave the apartment and gain skills so that he too might be able to support himself in some fashion one day. In true Jason Katims fashion it mixes complete heartbreak with small triumphs that warm the heart. It does not however gloss over the difficulties of all of the characters with the autistic characters just wanting to be understood for who they are and not always understanding why people view them as they do and their families struggling with the weight of helping their loved ones navigate an unforgiving world and the stresses that they themselves have to deal with.

Station Eleven

I read the book Station Eleven back in 2015 and did not re-read it prior to watching the series on HBO, so I didn’t remember enough about it to know how faithful it was or not to the source material. I gather from the things I’ve heard about it that there was quite a bit changed, but that everyone seemed to agree that the changes worked. So let’s go with that. I do know that I felt differently about the book than I did the tv show. I remember feeling like there was a lot of hope in the book that I did not necessarily feel in the tv show. Perhaps some of that is that I read the book prior to having ever lived through a pandemic myself, so I’m pretty sure my feelings about the tv show were colored by my own experiences. The pandemic in this show is way worse than COVID, killing something like 99% of the population. It was sort of interesting watching the end of this as the supply chain shortages caused by so many people getting sick from Omicron were starting to ramp up given this series shows how much worse it could have been with these characters living in a post-apocalyptic world in which pretty much all of the things we have come to rely on as a modern society like all kinds of technology cease to function because there aren’t enough people to keep them running. Weirdly my favorite parts of the series were the parts with Jeevan and young Kiersten struggling to survive right after the pandemic happened, which is something I usually hate and why I don’t tend to care for post-apocalyptic shows or books, and which I said in my review of the book that I was happy it didn’t spend a lot of time on. Ultimately I really did like this show, but based on how i remember feeling after reading the book I liked it better which is generally the case when it comes to book adaptations.

Good Sam

Good Sam stars Sophia Bush and Jason Isaacs. He’s a world renowned cardiologist who is very difficult to work with. Sam is his daughter who has been working under him but is planning on leaving the hospital for another job until he is shot and they ask her to fill in as the Chief of Cardiology. Now he’s back at his job and having to be supervised by her until the medical board signs off on his recovery and is very unhappy about being subordinate to anyone, especially his daughter. It’s sort of a mix between House and Grey’s Anatomy with a curmudgeonly but brilliant doctor at the center, a case of the week, and some soapy elements mixed together. It’s a decent network drama that’s more than just a straight procedural if you enjoy these kinds of shows.

Around the World in 80 Days

Masterpiece on PBS is currently airing this new adaptation of the Around the World in 80 Days starring David Tennant. It’s fine. I don’t love it. I’m usually doing something else like reading or messing around on the internet when my husband puts it on.

TV Diary

Mare of Easttown

I finally got around to watching Mare of Easttown long before everyone else was done talking about it. I literally managed to avoid all spoilers about the show until I was literally a couple episodes away from the end and looked at some year end best of list and managed to find out who the actual killer was right before I would have watched it after avoiding finding anything out for months. It didn’t really matter though because who the killer was was the least interesting part of the show to me. It was just one of those really good, well lived in shows that just took you completely into the world and felt so realistic in both character and place that the lives of the people were much more fascinating to me than the actual murder plot. Spoiler alert for later this week, it’s definitely ending up as one of my favorite shows of the year.

The Real World: Homecoming

I very much still remember the summer the first season of The Real World aired on MTV the summer before I started high school. I loved it so much. First it was just the factor of like everyone else at that point I had never seen anything like it on TV. Second, at that age this was completely aspirational. I thought they were all so cool and I wanted to be those cool people living in New York when I was their age. I quit watching after third season and didn’t really care for the second season that much. There was something pure in this very first season of the show that could never be recreated because after that people knew what it was or made decisions to try and force it to be something they wanted or acted certain ways to get on the show that never made it the same. Watching this reunion was just a huge trip down memory lane and hugely nostalgic for me in a way that I loved. I wish all the Becky stuff hadn’t derailed things in a way that made more than half of the show about that. Overall though I think that they did an awesome job of integrating the footage from the original series with the footage from the reunion shoot and the music was perfect. I wanted to create a Spotify playlist of all the music featured in this reunion because it was a perfect mix of things I loved back then and things I love today. Happily for me the folks at MTV already created a Spotify playlist so I didn’t even have to do the work. If you enjoyed the original series I do definitely recommend watching this. I gather they are now into episodes for the reunion of season 2, which I don’t care enough to watch. There’s a small possibility I might watch season 3 if they ever do that, but I’m not sure I care to relive the Puck of it all.

The Great Pottery Throw Down

I had heard some podcast people talking about The Great Pottery Throw Down previously and how it has a lot of the same gentle rhythms as The Great British Baking Show if you’re looking for something to watch while that show is between seasons. One of my friends was also extolling it to me recently, so I’ve been binge watching it on my Christmas break. I don’t like it was much as GBBS because with GBBS I at least think I could make something like that or that sounds really delicious I should find a similar recipe to bake. This does indeed share a lot of the same DNA, but I have no illusions that I could make any of the things that they are making, and I just care less about pottery than I do food. However, it is as was alluded to a good show to watch if you do need something to fill in that hole in your life for awhile. It is nice that Keith, one of the judges, can get so emotional over pottery that he will sometimes cry. It feels more authentic than the Hollywood handshake has become on GBBS. It’s harder to fake that and half the time it’s more that he gets emotional about a potter really pushing themselves and gaining a bit of skill than it is over someone creating the perfect pot. It’s a nice gentle show, and I know we can all use more of those these days.

Doogie Kamealoha, M.D.

Doogie Kamealoha, M.D. is a reboot of the old Doogie Howser show. In this case the young teenage genius doctor is Lahela Kamealoha, a Hawaiian girl. Her mother is also a fellow doctor at her hospital. Her father sells shaved ice at a stand outside the hospital. She also has two younger brothers. It’s a sweet little show. Nothing groundbreaking, but a decently entertaining half hour to watch and definitely good as family show if you have kids. Also, since it’s set in Hawaii it has some really great scenery.

Saved by the Bell

I loved Saved by the Bell as a kid. I watched every version of it from the original Good Morning Miss Bliss, the Saved by the Bell that everyone thinks of when you say Saved by the Bell, Saved by the Bell: The College Years, and Saved by the Bell: The New Class. So of course I had to watch the reboot of the show on Peacock. Slater and Jessie are regulars on the show as the gym coach and guidance counselor. Zach and Kelly, whose son Mac is one of the kid regulars, show up occasionally. Zach is now the governor of California and as a result of some his bad education policies schools are shut down and kids from a poor neighborhood are now bussed to Bayside. Three of those kids the main characters of the show along with Jessie’s son and a third already at Bayside student rounding out the new gang. It was fine. There were some good things about it and some bad things about it. I haven’t rewatched OG Saved by the Bell in a long time so either I’m misremembering or my views on things have changed enough that the characters seem different to me, but Zach and Kelly seem worse than they were in the original show. Zach is pretty awful and Kelly seems way more vapid than she did in the original. Also there’s some stuff that Mac does that definitely seems right out of the Zach Morris playbook from the 90s, but does not play really well in 2021. I may or may not continue watching in the future. It will probably depend on if there’s something else on Peacock that makes me want to resubscribe once the third season of this show is available because I definitely wouldn’t resubscribe solely for this.

Pretty Smart

Pretty Smart is a super dumb sit-com on Netflix. I really don’t recommend that anyone else watch it because it is not good. It’s super campy but in an even worse way than some of the ridiculous family shows like Fuller House because it’s not really aimed at kids. About a woman who gets dumped by her fiance after moving across the country to be with him and winds up moving in with her estranged sister and her roommates, who are all really dumb while she is a recently graduated Ph.D. student. It was a show we would throw on at the end of the night right before bed. I literally slept through at least half of most of the episodes, and I never felt compelled to go back and rewatch the parts that I missed if that tells you anything. I do not expect that Netflix will be renewing this for a second season.

Baking It

It tried this baking show on Peacock with Andy Samberg and Maya Rudolph serving as hosts and a group of grandmas serving as the judges. I only made it through one episode. It was way too much schtick and not enough baking for my tastes. Maybe the balance got a little better after they were done introducing the show in the first episode and as episodes went by there were fewer contestants to focus on, but at least in the first episode it was like 50% schtick, 40% chatting with contestants, and 10% actual baking. That ratio was way off for me. If it ever got better I will never know because my 6 months of free Peacock are now up, and there is nothing on there at the moment that would make me actually want to pay for it.

TV Diary

For All Mankind

For All Mankind is my current entry for the best tv show you’re not watching. I don’t know why this show hasn’t gotten more traction. There have been two seasons on AppleTV+ and I have barely heard anyone talk about it. It’s an alternate history of the space race starting in the 1960s and leaving off in the 1980s in season 2. It looks like season 3 is going to jump ahead to the 90s. From the little I saw other people saying about the show it seems like people like season 2 better. I still really liked the second season, but I did like season 1 a little bit better. The show has lots of good storylines for women. There’s a good balance between character development and really good plot driven action. I don’t want to give anything away, but I will just say that it’s actually kind of a miracle that nothing like what happens towards the end of season 2 has actually ever happened in regards to the moon. If you have AppleTV+ and haven’t watched this show, go start now. If you don’t have AppleTV+, pay the five bucks for a month and treat yourself to this and Ted Lasso.

The Other Two

The Other Two started off as a show on Comedy Central, but it moved to HBOMax for season two. It stars Molly Shannon as the mother of three kids. Cary and Brooke are in their twenties and trying to make lives for themselves in New York. Their teenage brother Chase winds up becoming a famous singer because of YouTube and all of their lives start to revolve around him and his career. I resisted watching this show for a long time because everything I heard about it when it started made me think that it involved a lot of cringe comedy, which I cannot abide. I have to watch that kind of stuff through my fingers, so a whole show whose premise revolved around it did not appeal to me. I heard such good stuff about it when season two premiered that I finally decided to give it a chance. I feel like I was a bit misled on the cringe comedy thing. Cary and Brooke do a lot of dumb stuff trying to get ahead in their lives and their careers that usually backfires on them, but I wouldn’t actually label it as cringe comedy. I don’t think it has quite as much heart as Schitt’s Creek, but it is one of those shows where some people that on the surface seem kind of terrible grow and develop and actually make you like them.

Only Murders in the Building

People seemed to really love Only Murders in the Building, a Hulu show starring Steve Martin, Martin Short, and Selena Gomez. After a murder happens in the building that their three characters live in they band together to try and solve the murder through a true crime podcast. I liked it well enough, but I didn’t love it the way everyone else seemed to. I will say that the season finale featured some A+ physical comedy from Steve Martin. The episode that was focused on Sting potentially being the murderer was also fantastic.

The Chair

The Chair on Netflix stars Sandra Oh as the newly appointed chair of an English department at a small New England college. She winds up having to deal with all kinds of problems including older tenured faculty whose classes are no longer drawing students, her sort of boyfriend and fellow professor saying something offensive in a class that sends the college into an uproar, and a young adopted daughter who she has a difficult relationship with. Sandra Oh was great as always, and as someone who works in higher education there were definitely some things that rang true about this show.

Girls 5Eva

Girls 5Eva is a show on Peacock about a girl group that was famous in the 90s reuniting in present day after their song is sampled by a hit rapper. It stars Busy Phillips, Paula Pell, Sara Bareilles, and Renee Elise Goldsberry. We Are Lady Parts is the superior Peacock show about a ladies in a band, but Girls 5Eva was a decent comedy to watch if you happen to subscribe to Peacock or get it free somehow like we currently are. I don’t know that I would both resubscribing to Peacock just to watch this when season two comes out, but if we happen to be subscribed for some other reason I would watch it.

The Big Leap

The Big Leap is one of the few new network shows I’m watching this season. There weren’t a lot of them to begin with because of COVID, and I wasn’t super excited about most of them. It’s about the production of a reality show in which people a who live in the Detroit area and are down on their luck are cast in a production of Swan Lake. This show is really terrible, but also I love it. It is not good by any stretch of the imagination. Nothing about the actual show or the show within the show make any sense. It’s entirely ridiculous that so many of these randomly cast people wind up having past connections of some sort and that they all immediately fall in love with someone else on the show. The dance scenes are fun though, and it’s mindless entertainment that is entertaining even if it is objectively not good. Fox declined to pick it up for a second half of the season. Supposedly they’re saying that it was only ever intended to have 11 episodes, but 11 episodes is not a number of episodes that tv usually travels in so I’m dubious that is true. At any rate, I’m not holding my breath for a second season, and I don’t really care if there is one. If Fox had pulled the plug at any point during the season due to the low ratings I would not have been up in arms about it.

Ghosts

Ghosts is the one other network tv show I’ve stuck with this season. It’s a CBS comedy about a couple who inherit a big old house in the country, which it turns out is haunted by centuries worth of ghosts. After a freak accident she winds up being about to see the ghosts. The comedy comes from her being the only one who can interact with them and the fact that the ghosts are from all different time periods who don’t always understand each other’s references or what is happening the world today. Apparently it’s based on a British show that I have never watched. I might go back and watch it at some point as well.

Zero Chill

Speaking of terrible tv shows that I continued to watch, I submit to you Zero Chill, a British teen drama available on Netflix. It’s about a family who moves from Canada to England so that their son can join a prestigious hockey team. His twin sister, who is a figure skater, does not take the move well. The storylines in this show are kind of dumb and unbelievable, and the acting is super questionable. However it has really great music including a bunch of songs by the band Chvrches, who I love and am super sad that I will selling the concert ticket I have to see them in a few weeks because Covid cases are going up again instead of down and it seems like a poor decision to go stand cramped in a crowded concert venue with 6,000 other people.

Squid Game

Hi it’s me the person that watched Squid Game and didn’t like it. I do not really understand why everyone was so obsessed with this show. I just didn’t care about any of the characters enough to worry about who was going to be killed, and it was patently obvious that the person who one was going to win. Pretty much it was easy to know who was going to be the next character that they spent any time on who was going to get killed. There was one good episode in my opinion and that was the marble episode. I don’t want to spoil anything for anyone who hasn’t watched, but if you have then you probably know why I liked that one the best.

The Wonder Years

I tried the new remake of The Wonder Years based on a Black family in the 60s. In theory it’s a really good idea, but it’s just not a show I’m that interested in. I never watched the original regularly either. This one has the same beats, and it just doesn’t draw me in. I’m sure people who liked the original one would like this version too.

Ordinary Joe

Ordinary Joe was one of the few network tv shows I tried. I quit it after two episodes. It stars James Wolk in a sort of Sliding Doors type story in which he winds up with three different versions of his life that you’re watching based on a decision he made in college. I wasn’t super invested in what was happening to him in any of the timelines and I just couldn’t see where the show was going to go. Like am I just supposed to watch him living three separate but sort of related lives for multiple seasons? Maybe some larger picture came into play in subsequent episodes after I quit watching, but I’ll never know.